How I learnt that every day has a healthy theme

One of the lessons I’ve been learning recently is that different days of the week tend to have predictably different characters, and that learning to recognise and work with that is a healthy habit.

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One of the lessons I’ve been learning recently is that different days of the week tend to have predictably different characters, and that learning to recognise and work with that is a healthy habit.

For instance, Tuesday tends to be busy with meetings, because that’s the day all the team is in.  So I bounce between agenda items, and the day is often spent in half-hour pockets.

And that’s OK, because that’s Tuesday.  The key is not to be fretting about the sermon prep I’m not getting done because of it.  As long as my week has rhythm and space, I can handle the different flow.  But an interruption on Monday morning is a distraction, which takes me considerable time to recover from.  I need to reset my spiritual clock after Sunday, and feed myself first. An interruption on Tuesday is fine, though, because that’s what Tuesday is for.

One makes me grumpy, the other makes me feel purposeful.

Wednesday morning changes with whether I’m taking a midweek service or not.  Thursday is more predictable and with blocks of study.

If I have twenty emails to deal with at the end of Monday, I’m feeling cranky.  But the same number at the end of a Sunday is OK because I’ve spent the day with people.  Emails can look after themselves.

Don’t expect to get the same amount of the same things done each day.

Be kind to yourself – theme your week, and plan to study most when you’re most ready for it.  Plan to see people when you’re not going to be checking your watch.

How do your Mondays and Tuesdays differ?  Pile in!

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